Infanta- The Notions of Receptive and Productive Vocabulary

Waring, Rob. (1999). The Notions of Receptive and Productive Vocabulary. In Tasks for Assessing Second Language Receptive and Productive Vocabulary (1). Retrieved from http://www.robwaring.org/papers/phd/ch1.html.

The researcher in Chapter 1, The Notions of Receptive and Productive Vocabulary, from his Ph.D. thesis Tasks for Assessing Second Language Receptive and Productive Vocabulary looks into the defining the terms, ‘Receptive’ and ‘Productive’ and also analyses the standard vocabulary test patterns. The definition, description and categorization of the notions regarding Receptive and Productive Vocabulary (RPV) are blithely accept as a ‘given’. The lack of clarity over definition of the notions of RPV is mirrored to some extent in the way RPV tests are described and labelled.

The four ways of describing Reception and Production are listed down. The researcher traces back the origin of the terms and explains how mental abilities such as ‘recognition’ and ‘recalling’ evolved to be the concepts for ‘passive’ and ‘active’ vocabulary. Myres(1914) was the first to propose a testing format for assessing recognition and recall memory for words. The researcher then puts forward the testing patterns proposed by Dolch and Kelley and Krey. The researcher tries to answer whether these kinds of task will help finding out anything significant about Receptive and Productive vocabulary. In Chapter 1, the researcher concludes that the relationship between test construct and the vocabulary knowledge is unclear. He concludes saying, “If we are to compare RPV using these tests then we must be very clear that these tests actually do measure Receptive and Productive vocabulary. If these tests are seen to be measuring something other than only RPV then we may need to rethink their use.”

 

 

 

 

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