Ganga_Gender Studies_Exploring Gender Identity in Early Childhood through Story Dictation and Dramatization

Exploring Gender Identity in Early Childhood through Story Dictation and Dramatization

                                                                    Jeff Daitsman

The role of a teacher in breaking social constructs of gender identity through research, un-gendered games and stories and interaction.

This article is more or  less of a collection of the experience, the author encountered during the research. Daitsman speaks about how children categorize the world around them. He speaks about how children around the age of two adhere to gender stereotyping. Daaitsman refers to Chouchenour and Chrisman, who state, “When boys or girls are overly concerned about gender-specific behavioural expectations, they may be unwilling to consider befriending a child of the opposite sex”. This is moves to the child grasping stereotypical behavioral patterns.  The author notes that playing together makes the girls livelier and the boys more agreeable. Through games and activities, he notices that a child’s full potential cannot be tapped by giving them separate “boys” and “girls” games. This validates the social constructivist concept that says, “Children are capable of doing much more in collective activity”.

The medium of storytelling is a powerful vehicle to explore preconceived notions of gender. The research mentioned in this article showed that gender differentiation in stories in stories is not necessarily correlated with age but rather with experience. The research article elaborates on how the impact of television and movies extend far beyond the screen leaving behind images that influenced the children’s story telling in a gendered fashion.

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Ganga: Continuation Gender and Household Economics. Reversed Realities.

Kabeer, Naila. “Benevolent Dictators, Maternal Altruists and Patriarchal Contracts: Gender and Household Economics”. Reversed Realities. Pauls Press. New Delhi. 1995. 95- 115. Print.

Reversed Realities: Gender Hierarchies in Development Thought

Naila Kabeer

(Continuation of the previous post…)

In the next portion of the chapter, Kabeer talks about the Beckerian model of a household, where every individual member is treated as disembodied units of labour, differentiated only productivity-related characteristics. And she gives examples of how responsibilities of the children and duties within the four walls of the house are delegated to the female members, and anything that links the household to the society is the male’s responsibility. This bring us to the ink with my research. When labour is delegated by default, the children understand this to be the way of the world. In their head, the female members all over the world have to be responsible for the matters inside the household.

Futhermore, Kabeer talks about Decision-making power in the household. Here, she talks about the women and children as the less powerful in the household. In this case she explains, decision-making happens in the general interest of the household, where the less powerful give up their preferences for the dominants'(male members) interests.

In this chapter of the book, Kabeer validates household economics and realities in the South Asian scenario, and to be specific the middle-class households of the South Asian regions. This is why certain ideas may negate the existence of equality in the household.

Ganga: Gender and Household Economics. Reversed Realities.

Kabeer, Naila. “Benevolent Dictators, Maternal Altruists and Patriarchal Contracts: Gender and Household Economics”. Reversed Realities. Pauls Press. New Delhi. 1995. 95- 104. Print.

Reversed Realities: Gender Hierarchies in Development Thought

                                                                                                               Naila Kabeer

Main Argument: Gender Politics and Hierarchies those are prevalent within the vicinities of a household.

The author in this chapter of the book speaks of gender imbalances in the household by categorising them under various sub chapters such as Fallacies of Aggregation: Gender and Household Welfare, Gender and Income, Gender and Household Labour .This is a very elaborate way o explain the power structure in a household.

This chapter of the book would help in bringing a bird’s eye view of the gender- power structure scenario in the society. As one knows, society shapes the individual, and vice-versa. And it is the individual who shapes his child’s mind. This portion would feed in as an analysis on the Father as the Dictator and the Mother as the Maternal Altruist.

(To be continued …)

Ganga Anand: “Sex and Temperament”. Male and Female

Mead, Margaret. “Sex and Temperament”. Male and Female. HarperCollins Publishers Inc. 2001. 119-30. Print.

This chapter “Sex and Temperament” from the book Male and Female not only talks about the primary sex membership, that is, a child’s acceptance of his or her own sexual inclination, but also answers the question growing children have, “how male?” or “how female?” She talks about how by putting a group of humans, in two groups of Masculine and Feminine, there will be others who seem to fall in the middle, to display fewer of pronounced physical features that are more characteristic of one sex than of the other.

In the latter half of the chapter, Mead also talks about identifying the most “girlish” among a group of boys and the most “boyish” among a group of little girls and also about how they would be the easiest to “train into identification of the opposite sex”. This is a rather strong statement to make as this classifies tomboy like girls and slightly effeminate boys as homosexuals, and that might not be the case with all of these children. Mead ends this chapter, by talking about the differences(physical) among people across cultures. She talks about how Balinese woman would be “boyish” with their narrow hips compared to the Western women.